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The Great Allegheny Passage Graphic Identity & Sign Guidelines Manual is available in a pdf format (8.38 MB) by clicking here.

 

Economic Impact Study

2012 Economic Impact Study
The Trail Town Program (a special project of The Progress Fund), Laurel Highlands Visitors Bureau (LHVB), and Allegheny Trail Alliance (ATA) contracted Frostburg State University and Saint Vincent College to conduct three phases of research:

2008 Economic Impact Study
The Trail Town Program (a special project of The Progress Fund), Laurel Highlands Visitors Bureau (LHVB), and Allegheny Trail Alliance (ATA) contracted Campos Inc to conduct three phases of research: This Phase 1 report highlights 2007 Economic Impact Research (Phase 1) which was aimed to address the following objectives:
  • To obtain gross sales revenue from trail side and trail-related businesses for 2006 and 2007.
  • To determine if businesses expanded operations in the past year and/or if they have plans to expand in the upcoming year.
  • To determine if businesses created new employee positions in the past year and/or if they have plans to add positions in the upcoming year.
  • To identify other actions or indicators that may have occurred as a direct result of the revitalization around the completion of the Great Allegheny Passage.
2002 User Survey for the Pennsylvania Allegheny Trail Alliance
This study reports the analysis of the use of the Allegheny Trail Alliance system in Western Pennsylvania during the 2002 trail season, April 15 through November 15.

A total of 5700 mail-in surveys were placed on vehicles at seven strategic trailheads along the 100 continuous miles of the Great Allegheny Passage from Boston to Garrett, plus Montour Trail. The survey collected 2229 responses by the cut-off date of December 18, 2002. This represents a 39% response rate.

The user surveys asked for information on trail use, distances traveled, spending in local communities, and on bikes and equipment. In addition, the Allegheny Trail Alliance has positioned trail counters at 11 strategic locations along the trail. The counter information was coupled with the user survey information to obtain estimates of trail-related spending.
  • The survey obtained information on small item purchases, such as food, clothing and gasoline, made in local trail-related communities.
  • The user survey collected information on the overnight lodging costs and number of nights stayed.
  • The use survey collected information on bike and equipment expenditures during that past two years.
  • The trail counter readings were taken at eleven sites to determine the number of persons visiting using the trails.
  • The visitation and spending estimates are combined to determine three types of spending.
  • The study has considered the residential origins of trail users.
To review the complete study, please visit the University Center for Social & Urban Research Survey Research Program. The report is titled, 2002 User Survey for the Pennsylvania Allegheny Trail Alliance.

Table of Contents and Executive Summary

Introduction And Methodology
Chapter One

Trail Usage
Chapter Two

The User Survey
Chapter Three

Direct Spending Associated With The Allegheny County Trail System In Neighboring Communities And The State Of Pennsylvania In 2002
Chapter Four

Geographic Origins Of Use And Indirect Spending Effects
Chapter Five

A Comparison Of The Current Study With The 1998 Study
Chapter Six

The User Survey and Tables for Estimating Visits
Appendix A  Appendix B
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