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Trail Towns

TrailTowns Explore the towns along the Great Allegheny Passage!

Cumberland (Mile 0) - Long known as the "Queen City of Maryland", Cumberland continues to build upon its transportation and industrial heritage. It is here at Mile Marker "0" the Great Allegheny Passage meets the C&O Canal Towpath to Washington DC. It is also where the city's central business district and pedestrian mall with its numerous attractions and services are located. Download a town map of Cumberland.

Frostburg (Mile 15) - The City of Frostburg sits on the Historic National Road and its coal industry and the establishment of Frostburg State University played a major role in the city's development. Shops and eateries are located just a few hundred feet up Depot Street hill from the Great Allegheny Passage, and are worth the trip. Download a town map of Frostburg.

Meyersdale (Mile 32) –The “Maple City” hosts the PA Maple Festival each year and is only 12 miles from the Maryland state border, where the trail is downhill all the way to Cumberland. Meyersdale is near thrilling trail features, like the 3,300 foot long Big Savage, and the Keystone and Salisbury viaducts that cross the Flaugherty Creek and Casselman River valleys. Download a town map of Meyersdale.

Rockwood (Mile 43) –This charming trailside community has a small town feel but offers trail services in a big way. B&Bs, bike shop, small restaurants, and camping are all at the trailhead or just in town. The Rockwood Opera House and Mill Shoppes is a former lumber mill and opera house that now houses shops and eateries in a National Register building. Download a town map of Rockwood.

Confluence (Mile 60) –Confluence is a great little vacation community with riverside dining, excellent B&Bs, a lovely town square, and a lot of activity. Annual events like Pumpkin Fest and Old Home Days are full of small town charm. Its location near the Youghiogheny River Lake and its proximity to Ohiopyle State Park make it a hub for outdoor recreationists and families looking for a getaway. Download a town map of Confluence.

Ohiopyle (Mile 72) – The falls and river recreation have made Ohiopyle a tourist destination since the advent of the railroads. Today, Ohiopyle is the headquarters of Ohiopyle State Park, one the most popular state parks in Pennsylvania. Opportunities for whitewater rafting, hiking, and, of course, biking make this town an outdoor recreation destination for over 1.5 million visitors each year. Download a town map of Ohiopyle.

Connellsville (Mile 88) – Connellsville's coke factories once fueled the regional economy and many of the town's buildings, churches, and residences are indicative of this prosperous past. Restaurants, shops, and other attractions encourage trail users to take a break and visit downtown Connellsville. Adirondack shelters at the northern end of the City make this a popular overnight stop for through-riders. Download a town map of Connellsville.

West Newton (Mile 114) – West Newton is a community historically associated with trails. The town's location on the Glades Trail (today Pennsylvania Route 31) brought Native Americans and early European settlers to the area. With the arrival of the train came the commercial Downtown that still characterizes West Newton today. Cross the century old bridge into downtown and relax in the new riverfront park, Simeral Square. Download a town map of West Newton.

Boston (Mile 128) - The Great Allegheny Passage passes through ‘Little Boston’ at a busy trailhead and ballpark. Just short ride or walk north of the ballpark on the GAP is Dead Man’s Hollow natural area, where you can park your bike and hike several miles of woodsy trail. On either side of the Yough River, you can find a number of refreshing dining establishments and shops here and across the Boston Bridge to Versailles. Explore the “Loop” trail between Boston and McKeesport on the opposite side of the Yough.


McKeesport (Mile 132) - McKeesport is at the junction of the Youghiogheny River and the Monongahela, which the Great Allegheny Passage follows to Pittsburgh. In the 1800s McKeesport was home to the National Tube Works, spurring the economic boom along with the rest of the Pittsburgh region. A popular spot in the city is the McKees Point Marina. McKeesport is also a connection to the Clairton Connector of the Montour Trail.

 

The Waterfront (Mile 140) - This locale along the Monongahela River just a few miles east of Pittsburgh comprises Munhall, Homestead, and West Homestead communities. This development was once the sprawling site for the Homestead Steel Works and now features dozens of retail stores, restaurants, and entertainment venues. Homestead’s downtown 8th Avenue remains an example of the Victorian-era mill towns that flourished around Pittsburgh.

The South Side of Pittsburgh (Mile 146) - A popular neighborhood of Pittsburgh, the South Side meets the trail on the downtown side of the Hot Metal Bridge. Formerly the site of massive steel mills and residences for its workers, South Side's East Carson Street is now a National Register Historic District and a funky, vibrant hive of shopping, entertainment, and creative activity, while one can access other of Pittsburgh's biking trails by following the waterfront. Recent development in the area has made it a hub for business. For more information check out their Facebook page.

Pittsburgh - Downtown (Mile 150) – Wrapped in rivers, intertwined with trails and packed with parks, Pittsburgh is popping with active possibilities. Bike, walk or inline skate miles of riverfront trails, soaking in fantastic urban views. Bicycle rentals are available along the trail.Begin your Ride of Your Life here, the 335 mile biking experience from Pittsburgh to DC on the Great Allegheny Passage and C&O Canal Towpath. You can plan your trip at VisitPittsburgh! and check out Friends of the Riverfront for the city's riverfront trails and interactive maps. 


Looking for places to stay, dine, and visit while in the towns? Choose an area from the overview map and go to the Business & Services link for a listing of town amenities.

 

The Trail Town Program is an economic development initiative along The Great Allegheny Passage. The Trail Town Program envisions a corridor of revitalized trailside communities along the Great Allegheny Passage that reap the economic benefits of trail-based tourism and recreation as part of a larger, coordinated approach to regional economic development.  The long-term economic viability of participating communities is to be achieved through concentrated business development efforts that capitalize on the trail user market. The goals of the program are simple:

  • Retain existing businesses.
  • Expand and increase revenues of existing businesses.
  • Recruit sustainable businesses.
  • Adopt the Trail Town vision and integrate its concept of a visitor-friendly environment in community planning.
Additional information on the vision and goals of the Trail Town program can be found at www.trailtowns.org
Download the Trail Town Manual and Other Materials
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